Skunk-B-Gon @ Lake McIntosh

After previous attempts at McIntosh Lake in Peachtree City yielded no fish, I was finally able to bring up a bass. This fish was caught on a wacky rigged 5″ Zoom worm, Watermelon Seed color. Caught near a mat of leaves and debris that had formed near the entrance to Shoal Creek, depth there was about 5-6′.  The fish pictured is a Largemouth Bass, 18″ long and weighed 3.7 lbs.

 

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Judging Condition and Age of Fish

Age

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Condition

Whole Bass Baked with Mustard and Herbs

Whole Bass Baked with Mustard and Herbs

Whole Bass Baked with Mustard and Herbs

Ingredients

  • 1 2 pound largemouth bass; cleaned, scaled and dressed
  • 1/4 cup olive oil
  • 1 tablespoon Kosher salt
  • 6 sprigs fresh rosemary
  • 2 cloves fresh garlic, peeled and thinly sliced
  • 1/3 cup Dijon mustard
  • 1 cup dry white wine

Instructions

  1. Rub fish inside and out with olive oil and season with Kosher salt. Cut three slits in the each side of the fish. Place rosemary sprigs and garlic slices inside the slits (and it won’t hurt to put a few more inside the cavity). Place fish in a baking dish. Combine mustard and wine and pour over fish. Bake for 10 – 15 minutes or until just done.
  2. Note: If you’d rather cook this one on the grill, leave the fish in the baking dish for 30 minutes with the wine/mustard mixture over. Don’t place the dish in the oven. Instead, refrigerate for 1 hour. Remove the fish from the fridge and place on a medium-hot barbecue until browned on both sides and just cooked.

From sportingchef.com

Fish Chowder (Rhode Island.) The Whitehouse Cookbook (1887)

Fry five or six slices of fat pork crisp in the bottom of the pot you are to make your chowder in; take them out and chop them into small pieces, put them back into the bottom of the pot with their own gravy. (This is much better than having the slices whole.)

Cut four pounds of fresh cod or sea-bass into pieces two inches square, and lay enough of these on the pork to cover it. Follow with a layer of chopped onions, a little parsley, summer savory and pepper, either black or cayenne. Then a layer of split Boston, or butter, or whole cream crackers, which have been soaked in warm water until moistened through, but not ready to break. Above this put a layer of pork and repeat the order given above—onions, seasoning (not too much), crackers and pork, until your materials are exhausted. Let the topmost layer be buttered crackers well soaked. Pour in enough cold water to barely cover all. Cover the pot, stew gently for an hour, watching that the water does not sink too low. Should it leave the upper layer exposed, replenish cautiously from the boiling tea-kettle. When the chowder is thoroughly done, take out with a perforated skimmer and put into a tureen. Thicken the gravy with a tablespoonful of flour and about the same quantity of butter; boil up and pour over the chowder. Serve sliced lemon, pickles and stewed tomatoes with it, that the guests may add if they like.